Tri Again (Again)

I didn’t expect to find the hourglass fractal playing with squares. I even less expected it playing with triangles. Isosceles right triangles, to be precise. Then again, I found it first playing with the L-triomino, which is composed of three squares. And an isosceles triangle is half of a square. So it all fits. This is an isosceles right triangle:
isosceles_right_triangle

Isosceles right triangle


It’s mirror-symmetrical, so it looks the same in a mirror unless you label one of the acute-angled corners in some way, like this:

right_triangle_chiral_1

Right triangle with labelled corner


right_triangle_chiral_2

Right triangle reflected


Reflection is how you find the hourglass fractal. First, divide a right triangle into four smaller right triangles.

right_triangle_div4

Right triangle rep-tiled


Then discard one of the smaller triangles and repeat. If the acute corners of the smaller triangles have different orientations, one of the permutations creates the hourglass fractal, like this:

right_triangle_div4_1

Hourglass #1


right_triangle_div4_2

Hourglass #2


right_triangle_div4_3

Hourglass #3


right_triangle_div4_4

Hourglass #4


right_triangle_div4_5

Hourglass #5


right_triangle_div4_6

Hourglass #6


right_triangle_div4_7

Hourglass #7


right_triangle_div4_8

Hourglass #8


right_triangle_div4_9

Hourglass #9


right_triangle_div4_123_010

Hourglass animated


Another permutation of corners creates what I’ve decided to call the crane fractal, like this:
right_triangle_div4_123_001

Crane fractal animated


right_triangle_div4_123_001_static

Crane fractal (static)


The crane fractal is something else that I first found playing with the L-triomino:

l-triomino_234

Crane fractal from L-triomino


Previously pre-posted:

Square Routes
Tri Again