Kea Here

Kea, Nestor notabilis

Kea, Nestor notabilis, via Guardian / BBC

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Performativizing Papyrocentricity #52

Papyrocentric Performativity Presents:

Reds in the HeadThe War of the Worlds, H.G. Wells (1898)

Canine the BarbarianThe Call of the Wild, White Fang, and Other Stories, Jack London (Penguin American Library 1981)

Star-StuffThe Universe in 100 Key Discoveries, Giles Sparrow (Quercus 2012)

An Island of Her OwnThe Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps, Edward Brooke-Hitching (Simon & Schuster 2016)


Or Read a Review at Random: RaRaR

The Swing’s the Thing

Order emerges from chaos with a triangle or pentagon, but not with a square. That is, if you take a triangle or a pentagon, chose a point inside it, then move the point repeatedly halfway towards a vertex chosen at random, a fractal will appear:

triangle

Sierpiński triangle from point jumping halfway to randomly chosen vertex


pentagon

Sierpiński pentagon from point jumping halfway to randomly chosen vertex


But it doesn’t work with a square. Instead, the interior of the square slowly fills with random points:

square

Square filling with point jumping halfway to randomly chosen vertex


As I showed in Polymorphous Perverticity, you can create fractals from squares and randomly moving points if you ban the point from choosing the same vertex twice in a row, and so on. But there are other ways. You can take the point, move it towards a vertex at random, then swing it around the center of the square through some angle before you mark its position, like this:

square_sw90

Point moves at random, then swings by 90° around center


square_sw180

Point moves at random, then swings by 180° around center


You can also adjust the distance of the point from the center of the square using a formula like dist = r * rmdist, where dist is the distance, r is the radius of the circle in which the circle is drawn, and rm takes values like 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and so on:

square_dist_rm0_05

Point moves at random, dist = r * 0.05 – dist


square_dist_rm0_1

Point moves at random, dist = r * 0.1 – dist


square_dist_rm0_2

Point moves at random, dist = r * 0.2 – dist


But you can swing the point while applying a vertex-ban, like banning the previously chosen vertex, or the vertex 90° or 180° away. In fact, swinging the points converts one kind of vertex ban into the others.

square_ban0

Point moves at random towards vertex not chosen previously


square_ban0_sw405

Point moves at random, then swings by 45°


square_ban0_sw360

Point moves at random, then swings by 360°


square_ban0_sw697

Point moves at random, then swings by 697.5°


square_ban0_sw720

Point moves at random, then swings by 720°


square_ban0_sw652

Point moves at random, then swings by 652.5°


square_ban0_swing_va_animated

Animated angle swing


You can also reverse the swing at every second move, swing the point around a vertex instead of the center or around a point on the circle that encloses the square. Here are some of the fractals you get applying these techniques.
square_ban0_sw45_rock

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 45°, -45°


square_ban0_sw90_rock

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 90°, -90°


square_ban0_sw135_rock

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 135°, -135°


square_ban0_sw180_rock

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 180°, -180°


square_ban0_sw225

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 225°, -225°


square_ban0_sw315

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 315°, -315°


square_ban0_sw360_rock

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 360°, -360°


square_swing_vx0_va_animated

Animated alternate swing


square_circle_sw45

Point moves at random, then swings around point on circle by 45°


square_circle_sw67

Point moves at random, then swings around point on circle by 67.5°


square_circle_sw90

Point moves at random, then swings around point on circle by 90°


square_circle_sw112

Point moves at random, then swings around point on circle by 112.5°


square_circle_sw135

Point moves at random, then swings around point on circle by 135°


square_circle_sw180

Point moves at random, then swings around point on circle by 180°


square_circle_sw_animated

Animated circle swing


He Say, He Sigh, He Sow #42

« Il n’y avait plus dans la rue que les boutiquiers et les chats. » — Albert Camus, L’Étranger (1942).

    “There was no longer anything in the street but shopkeepers and cats.” — Camus, The Outsider.

Tri Again (Again)

I didn’t expect to find the hourglass fractal playing with squares. I even less expected it playing with triangles. Isosceles right triangles, to be precise. Then again, I found it first playing with the L-triomino, which is composed of three squares. And an isosceles triangle is half of a square. So it all fits. This is an isosceles right triangle:
isosceles_right_triangle

Isosceles right triangle


It’s mirror-symmetrical, so it looks the same in a mirror unless you label one of the acute-angled corners in some way, like this:

right_triangle_chiral_1

Right triangle with labelled corner


right_triangle_chiral_2

Right triangle reflected


Reflection is how you find the hourglass fractal. First, divide a right triangle into four smaller right triangles.

right_triangle_div4

Right triangle rep-tiled


Then discard one of the smaller triangles and repeat. If the acute corners of the smaller triangles have different orientations, one of the permutations creates the hourglass fractal, like this:

right_triangle_div4_1

Hourglass #1


right_triangle_div4_2

Hourglass #2


right_triangle_div4_3

Hourglass #3


right_triangle_div4_4

Hourglass #4


right_triangle_div4_5

Hourglass #5


right_triangle_div4_6

Hourglass #6


right_triangle_div4_7

Hourglass #7


right_triangle_div4_8

Hourglass #8


right_triangle_div4_9

Hourglass #9


right_triangle_div4_123_010

Hourglass animated


Another permutation of corners creates what I’ve decided to call the crane fractal, like this:
right_triangle_div4_123_001

Crane fractal animated


right_triangle_div4_123_001_static

Crane fractal (static)


The crane fractal is something else that I first found playing with the L-triomino:

l-triomino_234

Crane fractal from L-triomino


Previously pre-posted:

Square Routes
Tri Again