Terminal Teraticity…

Americotrop-ism: n. literally, a tendency or habit of moving towards America; hence, a tendency or habit of adopting American culture, vocabulary and usage when one is not oneself American. | -ist, -ic(al) [Americ(a) + -o- + tropism, on the analogy of phototropism, chemotropism, geotropism, etc]

• “The Guardian-reading community displays a marked Americotropism.”

4 thoughts on “Terminal Teraticity…

  1. Do you think there’s any truth to the idea that the UK is the America of Europe? (Speaking as someone who lives in Australia, the America of the Asia-Pacific region?)

    They have a similar lingua franca, similar Protestantism, both have contributed disproportionate amounts to various fields (literature, television, science, rock and roll), both could be said to have an interest in the prurient, combined with a streak of puritanicalness (Pierre Guyotat has a long career in France, while David Britton goes to prison in the UK), both have a tendency towards overseas protectionism, etc.

    Though I don’t think Americanism always has to be a bad thing. In some ways, the US could stand to be even more American.

    • Do you think there’s any truth to the idea that the UK is the America of Europe? (Speaking as someone who lives in Australia, the America of the Asia-Pacific region?)

      It’s a big topic. They’ve both been highly influential, but Poms are not as vulgar and deracinated as the Septics. Obviously. I like this quote: “America is the only country that went from barbarism to decadence without civilisation in between.” But they’ve retained some Victorian things that the UK has lost.

      They have a similar lingua franca, similar Protestantism, both have contributed disproportionate amounts to various fields (literature, television, science, rock and roll),

      I don’t think the Protestantism is that similar. England has had a state church and the crazy sects that sprang up during the English Civil War didn’t flourish the way they have in the US. See Waugh’s The Loved One, for example.

      both could be said to have an interest in the prurient, combined with a streak of puritanicalness (Pierre Guyotat has a long career in France, while David Britton goes to prison in the UK),

      Belgium has just jailed a comedian for blasphemy, after France gave him a suspended sentence for the same offence. Nowadays Britton is fine, but a police chief would go to jail if they repeated what “God’s Cop” James Anderton said about AIDS and the Gay Community (PBUI). (Trigger warning: he suggested that gays don’t lead wholly hygienic lives.) However, Britton will certainly get in trouble again when Savoy release Muhammad****ers later this year. In the opening scene, Lord Horror [censored] Barack Obama with a greased copy of the [censored]. As for Hillary Clinton — [censored].

      both have a tendency towards overseas protectionism, etc.

      Well, the US is an extension of the UK in a lot of ways. This essay at the Eldritch Dark sets out my case against the US:

      Science or Sorcery?: Interrogating the Supratextual Interface of Klarkash-Ton and the Hobbitual Offender

      Though I don’t think Americanism always has to be a bad thing. In some ways, the US could stand to be even more American.

      I’m highly Americanized. It’s hard not to be. As ever, the important thing in discussing the topic is to make enemies and alienate people.

  2. Belgium has just jailed a comedian for blasphemy, after France gave him a suspended sentence for the same offence.

    My impression was that Continental Europe is touchy about political and religious topics, while the UK and the US are more hung up on sex. There’s probably exceptions either way, and censoring bodies don’t necessarily reflect the viewpoints of the entire country. Films in the US, for example, receive content ratings from the MPAA, which is apparently a few dozen middle-aged people making judgments in a room together with no outside accountability.

    However, Britton will certainly get in trouble again when Savoy release Muhammad****ers later this year. In the opening scene, Lord Horror [censored] Barack Obama with a greased copy of the [censored]. As for Hillary Clinton — [censored].

    Disgustipating. I just threw up my stomach. But does he eat a bag of salt and vinegar crisps?

    Science or Sorcery?: Interrogating the Supratextual Interface of Klarkash-Ton and the Hobbitual Offender

    So America’s like Saruman, and Britain’s like Gandalf. That sounds like an interesting and plausible way of describing the differences.

    Here’s another one I’ve heard, from former Exile author John Dolan (the article is heavily political/annoying, but he makes a few good points. Plus he shits on Martin Amis’s prose in an amusing fashion.)

    His thesis is that Britain started the 20th century with a vast overseas empire, which it gradually lost, and so the British national character is one of pessimism and gloom. Rome in the last days, if you like. But America went from strength to strength in the 20th century, and so their national character is one of optimism.

    Of course, what goes up must come down. The 21st century hasn’t been very kind to America so far, and they’re beginning to discover a taste for British despondency.

    • My impression was that Continental Europe is touchy about political and religious topics, while the UK and the US are more hung up on sex.

      That was true once, but Anderton was criticized at the time, and would be prosecuted now, for blasphemy against a sacred minority, not for discussing sex. The UK and US have become more European in their politics. I will not explore the reasons for this.

      There’s probably exceptions either way, and censoring bodies don’t necessarily reflect the viewpoints of the entire country.

      They certainly don’t. And western governments don’t either. We have the best democracies money can buy.

      But does he eat a bag of salt and vinegar crisps?

      It seems (further readings may clarify) to be prawn cocktail this time. They don’t call Savoy the Maverick Munch-Bunch for nothing. Indeed, Savoy may shortly be storming the ramparts of the savoury-comestibles / party-nibbles market in earnest. “SavSnaq — you’ll nosh nowt nicer!”

      So America’s like Saruman, and Britain’s like Gandalf. That sounds like an interesting and plausible way of describing the differences.

      And Saruman was an imitator of Sauron.

      His thesis is that Britain started the 20th century with a vast overseas empire, which it gradually lost, and so the British national character is one of pessimism and gloom. Rome in the last days, if you like. But America went from strength to strength in the 20th century, and so their national character is one of optimism.

      That also applies to Britain and Australia. Q. How can you tell that a Jumbo jet is full of poms? A. It carries on whining when the engine is switched off.

      Of course, what goes up must come down. The 21st century hasn’t been very kind to America so far, and they’re beginning to discover a taste for British despondency.

      The US is now run by people who hate the traditional nation and want to destroy it. The crime-thinker Steve Sailer has been busy documenting this for years. Miriam Stimbers’ core EngLit / psychoanalysis skill-set is perfectly suited to the new improved America. Greg Cochran’s physics and genetics aren’t.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s