Get Your Tox Off

There’s only one word for it: toxic. The proliferation of this word is an incendiarily irritating abjectional aspect of contemporary culture. My visit to Google Ngram has confirmed my worst suspicions:

Toxic in English

Toxic in English

Toxic in English fiction

Toxic in English fiction

“Feral” isn’t irritating in quite the same way, but has similarly proliferated:

Feral in English

Feral in English

Feral in English fiction

Feral in English fiction

Noxious note: In terms of majorly maximal members of the Maverick Messiah community (such as myself), it goes without saying that when we deploy such items of Guardianese, we are being ironic dot dot dot


Previously pre-posted (please peruse):

Septics vs Dirties
Ex-term-in-ate!
Reds Under the Thread
Titus Graun

2 thoughts on “Get Your Tox Off

  1. Ngram isn’t totally accurate, since sometimes books are revised to include anachronistic words. Searching for “Youtube” and “Facebook” brings up results from the 70s, for example. But it’s strangely addictive, if you want to keep close tabs on the maverick heartbeat of the radical underground.

    HP Lovecraft has virtually nothing until 1960, then a sharp increase in activity.

    Algernon Blackwood, Arthur Machen, and Lord Dunsany were popular in the early 20th century, but sliding towards obscurity now.

    Edgar Allen Poe has been pretty consistently popular from 1860 to now – but like Lovecraft, he only received serious attention after his death.

    JRR Tolkien achieved mass popularity during the 1960s hippie movement (to his dismay), then another spike from the recent movies.

    George Orwell received lots of attention in an unsurprising year.

    Will Self is currently at the peak of his fame. Why? Who reads his books?

    • Dunsany doesn’t deserve to fade, but in a way it’s appropriate that he does. CAS is fading too. And Heliogabalus / Elagabalus.

      “Majorly maximal” returns nothing and so does “Maverick Messiah”, but “maximal member” takes off like a rocket in the 1950s.

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