He Say, He Sigh, He Sow #23

“Brion knew it wasn’t William’s fault. But in terms of the general popular culture not recognizing the importance of his contribution, there was a little bitterness.” — phantasmagoric freethinker Genesis P-Orridge interrogates issues around Brion Gysin and William S. Burroughs.


Elsewhere other-posted:

Ex-term-in-ate!

8 thoughts on “He Say, He Sigh, He Sow #23

  1. Laugh if you want, but give him/her/it some credit – writing funny bad English is hard. I tried to write some for my site and the best I could do is “stands bluntly at the cutting edge of discursive theory”, and “throws the postmodern baby out with the sub-structuralist bathwater”.

    http://ben-ts.net/about-2/

    It will have to suffice until I can afford the person who writes Creation Books’ press copy.

    http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2779479-kicks

    “Reed’s androgynous visions embrace a uniquely poetic universe […] demonstrating with consummate artistry how the spangled threads of his influences draw together to form a maverick blueprint…”

    • Laugh if you want, but give him/her/it some credit – writing funny bad English is hard.

      I’m not laughing, but P-Orridge is part of the hive-mind. That’s why he uses Guardianese.

      “Reed’s androgynous visions embrace a uniquely poetic universe […] demonstrating with consummate artistry how the spangled threads of his influences draw together to form a maverick blueprint…”

      That definitely looks like a joke, but might be Havoc writing while pixilated.

      MawBTS is regarded as the century’s greatest writer in the last 100 years. His oeuvre covers both sides of the political compass, engages with every corner of the cultural sphere, and stands bluntly at the cutting edge of discursive theory – all while avoiding every landmine in the rhetorical playbook.

      I think the first sentence is too obvious. This is one of those things that demonstrate the weakness of consciousness: one has to be plugged ex-post-facto into the hive-mind to launch metaphors successfully into the lithostatic stratosphere of post-visceral performativity.

      I’ve been thinking of a review of JGB’s Complete Short Stories. He is v. good and the occasional bad writing makes him better in a way. He’s a Beethoven, not a Mozart: he had to wrestle with his art.

      My po-mo generator is still available, I’ve discovered:

      Paradigms Loused

  2. That definitely looks like a joke, but might be Havoc writing while pixilated.

    That’s not all. Creation has a trans(lated/gressive) edition of Pierre Guyotat’s Eden Eden Eden, with a foreword by Stephen Barber. “Guyotat’s language is welded into a headlong rush into the wild terrain of obscenity”…”Guyotat has relentlessly beaten the comatose, catatonic nature of language into an anatomical matter of writing”…”Guyotat views the act of writing as a physical secretion – a feral exudation of the body’s material, creatively expectorating deadly substances which are savage and interrogative in their visceral impact upon the reader.”

    That seems like a joke too, but you never know. Certainly it was a joke many people were in on.

    I think the first sentence is too obvious. This is one of those things that demonstrate the weakness of consciousness: one has to be plugged ex-post-facto into the hive-mind to launch metaphors successfully into the lithostatic stratosphere of post-visceral performativity.

    Point well taken. I guess one needs (at least) a double doctorate in Gender Studies before he can effectively engage issues with the pros.

    I’ve been thinking of a review of JGB’s Complete Short Stories. He is v. good and the occasional bad writing makes him better in a way. He’s a Beethoven, not a Mozart: he had to wrestle with his art.

    He is very good, and I wish I’d found him sooner. I was bullshitting when I said his short stories are better than his novels, I actually hadn’t finished any of his novels at the time (I’m concurrently reading Crash, The Drowned World, and Empire of the Sun). But he does seem like the sort of author who’d be better at short stories.

    • That’s not all. Creation has a trans(lated/gressive) edition of Pierre Guyotat’s Eden Eden Eden, with a foreword by Stephen Barber. “Guyotat’s language is welded into a headlong rush into the wild terrain of obscenity”…”Guyotat has relentlessly beaten the comatose, catatonic nature of language into an anatomical matter of writing”…”Guyotat views the act of writing as a physical secretion – a feral exudation of the body’s material, creatively expectorating deadly substances which are savage and interrogative in their visceral impact upon the reader.”

      “Visceral”, “feral” — key vocab for core Guardianistas. If Barber were an engineer, his “constructs” would fall down or blow up. But he’s a Guardian-reader with an arts degree, so his “constructs” are hot air.

      That seems like a joke too, but you never know. Certainly it was a joke many people were in on.

      Myriads, myriads, off the wall dot dot dot

      I think Havoc has an EngLit degree. That’s not a good sign. He’s a Burroughs fan too. An even worse sign. Guaranteed employment in the Ministry of Maverickness.

      He is very good, and I wish I’d found him sooner.

      Very strange too. My ambition would be to imagine like Ballard, write like Waugh and live like Heliogabalus. But without the charioteers and the eternal infamy. I get enough of that already.

  3. I think Havoc has an EngLit degree. That’s not a good sign. He’s a Burroughs fan too. An even worse sign. Guaranteed employment in the Ministry of Maverickness.

    He doesn’t sound like a candidate for TIME’s Person of the Year, at least if what I’ve read’s accurate. But I liked some of what he wrote and I discovered lots of authors through Creation (yourself included). He’s a dishonest chef who serves nice food. I still check his shell companies from time to time to see if he’s putting out anything new.

    On that note: new Whitechapel book, plz.

    • He doesn’t sound like a candidate for TIME’s Person of the Year, at least if what I’ve read’s accurate.

      It is. He’s a crook alright. People might find excuses for him, but he’s made the blunder of defrauding (gasp) a BLACK too. That’s unforgivable. It’s a shame that Havoc hasn’t matched his genuine attachment to literature and books with some honesty, but he’s never grown up and he’s too easily led astray.

      On that note: new Whitechapel book, plz.

      I have been pondering it, but velleity has not yet turned into volition. The Overlord will post if this situation transitions in terms of quantum-leaping to an actualized voluntifactive modality.

      • It is. He’s a crook alright. People might find excuses for him, but he’s made the blunder of defrauding (gasp) a BLACK too.

        At least he hasn’t ripped off a woman yet. Terence Sellers’ long hair and makeup gave me pause for thought, but then I saw his hard, virile cheekbones and jawline.

        http://www.terencesellers.com/photo1.php

        I have been pondering it, but velleity has not yet turned into volition. The Overlord will post if this situation transitions in terms of quantum-leaping to an actualized voluntifactive modality.

        Fair enough. Hopefully you won’t imitate Ballard and Waugh in the sense that they will never write fiction again. Gweel‘s a very strange book – I only recently noticed the Fibonacci sequence in the table of contents.

      • At least he hasn’t ripped off a woman yet.

        O ye of little faith:

        Jane Giles: “My estimation is that Creation will have sold at least 5,000 copies in ten years… [around] £27,657 made by Creation, less their production costs.”

        Agnès Pierron: “James Williamson, writing under the pen-name of ‘Jack Hunter’ has plagiarized two of my books … and has illegally released them as his own work.”

        Lisa Falour: “Both editions of my book are unauthorized… I never got a penny from Velvet/Creation…”

        Hegemonic Havoc the Hypogean Heresiarch

        But they’re all white, so the Black male is still Top Victim.

        Hopefully you won’t imitate Ballard and Waugh in the sense that they will never write fiction again.

        I have stories, but need to re-read and revise them. 2013 would be a good year to publish them, so I will try to get to work.

        Gweel’s a very strange book – I only recently noticed the Fibonacci sequence in the table of contents.

        It was easier than working out the real page numbers.

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