Performativizing Papyrocentricity #52

Papyrocentric Performativity Presents:

Reds in the HeadThe War of the Worlds, H.G. Wells (1898)

Canine the BarbarianThe Call of the Wild, White Fang, and Other Stories, Jack London (Penguin American Library 1981)

Star-StuffThe Universe in 100 Key Discoveries, Giles Sparrow (Quercus 2012)

An Island of Her OwnThe Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps, Edward Brooke-Hitching (Simon & Schuster 2016)


Or Read a Review at Random: RaRaR

The Swing’s the Thing

Order emerges from chaos with a triangle or pentagon, but not with a square. That is, if you take a triangle or a pentagon, chose a point inside it, then move the point repeatedly halfway towards a vertex chosen at random, a fractal will appear:

triangle

Sierpiński triangle from point jumping halfway to randomly chosen vertex


pentagon

Sierpiński pentagon from point jumping halfway to randomly chosen vertex


But it doesn’t work with a square. Instead, the interior of the square slowly fills with random points:

square

Square filling with point jumping halfway to randomly chosen vertex


As I showed in Polymorphous Perverticity, you can create fractals from squares and randomly moving points if you ban the point from choosing the same vertex twice in a row, and so on. But there are other ways. You can take the point, move it towards a vertex at random, then swing it around the center of the square through some angle before you mark its position, like this:

square_sw90

Point moves at random, then swings by 90° around center


square_sw180

Point moves at random, then swings by 180° around center


You can also adjust the distance of the point from the center of the square using a formula like dist = r * rmdist, where dist is the distance, r is the radius of the circle in which the circle is drawn, and rm takes values like 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and so on:

square_dist_rm0_05

Point moves at random, dist = r * 0.05 – dist


square_dist_rm0_1

Point moves at random, dist = r * 0.1 – dist


square_dist_rm0_2

Point moves at random, dist = r * 0.2 – dist


But you can swing the point while applying a vertex-ban, like banning the previously chosen vertex, or the vertex 90° or 180° away. In fact, swinging the points converts one kind of vertex ban into the others.

square_ban0

Point moves at random towards vertex not chosen previously


square_ban0_sw405

Point moves at random, then swings by 45°


square_ban0_sw360

Point moves at random, then swings by 360°


square_ban0_sw697

Point moves at random, then swings by 697.5°


square_ban0_sw720

Point moves at random, then swings by 720°


square_ban0_swing_va_animated

Animated angle swing


square_ban0_sw652

Point moves at random, then swings by 652.5°


You can also reverse the swing at every second move, swing the point around a vertex instead of the center or around a point on the circle that encloses the square. Here are some of the fractals you get applying these techniques.
square_ban0_sw45_rock

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 45°, -45°


square_ban0_sw90_rock

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 90°, -90°


square_ban0_sw135_rock

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 135°, -135°


square_ban0_sw180_rock

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 180°, -180°


square_ban0_sw225

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 225°, -225°


square_ban0_sw315

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 315°, -315°


square_ban0_sw360_rock

Point moves at random, then swings alternately by 360°, -360°


square_swing_vx0_va_animated

Animated alternate swing


square_circle_sw45

Point moves at random, then swings around point on circle by 45°


square_circle_sw67

Point moves at random, then swings around point on circle by 67.5°


square_circle_sw90

Point moves at random, then swings around point on circle by 90°


square_circle_sw112

Point moves at random, then swings around point on circle by 112.5°


square_circle_sw135

Point moves at random, then swings around point on circle by 135°


square_circle_sw180

Point moves at random, then swings around point on circle by 180°


square_circle_sw_animated

Animated circle swing


He Say, He Sigh, He Sow #42

« Il n’y avait plus dans la rue que les boutiquiers et les chats. » — Albert Camus, L’Étranger (1942).

    “There was no longer anything in the street but shopkeepers and cats.” — Camus, The Outsider.

Tri Again (Again)

I didn’t expect to find the hourglass fractal playing with squares. I even less expected it playing with triangles. Isosceles right triangles, to be precise. Then again, I found it first playing with the L-triomino, which is composed of three squares. And an isosceles triangle is half of a square. So it all fits. This is an isosceles right triangle:
isosceles_right_triangle

Isosceles right triangle


It’s mirror-symmetrical, so it looks the same in a mirror unless you label one of the acute-angled corners in some way, like this:

right_triangle_chiral_1

Right triangle with labelled corner


right_triangle_chiral_2

Right triangle reflected


Reflection is how you find the hourglass fractal. First, divide a right triangle into four smaller right triangles.

right_triangle_div4

Right triangle rep-tiled


Then discard one of the smaller triangles and repeat. If the acute corners of the smaller triangles have different orientations, one of the permutations creates the hourglass fractal, like this:

right_triangle_div4_1

Hourglass #1


right_triangle_div4_2

Hourglass #2


right_triangle_div4_3

Hourglass #3


right_triangle_div4_4

Hourglass #4


right_triangle_div4_5

Hourglass #5


right_triangle_div4_6

Hourglass #6


right_triangle_div4_7

Hourglass #7


right_triangle_div4_8

Hourglass #8


right_triangle_div4_9

Hourglass #9


right_triangle_div4_123_010

Hourglass animated


Another permutation of corners creates what I’ve decided to call the crane fractal, like this:
right_triangle_div4_123_001

Crane fractal animated


right_triangle_div4_123_001_static

Crane fractal (static)


The crane fractal is something else that I first found playing with the L-triomino:

l-triomino_234

Crane fractal from L-triomino


Previously pre-posted:

Square Routes
Tri Again

Toxic Turntable #10

Currently listening…

• UnderHill, EnCrypt (2008)
• The Whelms, Malt Does More (1981)
• Nhyul, 883·307·173 (1993)
• Exqvies, Deinococcus radiodurans (2010)
• Bunu Zakr, Mbigak II (1968)
• The Glamours, Lottery in Babylon (2008)
• Incgo, DeMTR (1993)
• Aokka, Ophicléide (1985)
• Diamond Head, Canterbury (1983)
• Z Dirqenav, Z (1972)


Previously pre-posted:

Toxic Turntable #1
Toxic Turntable #2
Toxic Turntable #3
Toxic Turntable #4
Toxic Turntable #5
Toxic Turntable #6
Toxic Turntable #7
Toxic Turntable #8
Toxic Turntable #9

Square Routes

One of the pleasures of exploring an ancient city like York or Chester is that of learning new routes to the same destination. There are byways and alleys, short-cuts and diversions. You set off intending to go to one place and end up in another.

Maths is like that, even at its simplest. There are many routes to the same destination. I first found the fractal below by playing with the L-triomino, or the shape created by putting three squares in the shape of an L. You can divide it into four copies of the same shape and discard one copy, then do the same to each of the sub-copies, then repeat. I’ve decided to call it the hourglass fractal:

l-triomino_124

Hourglass fractal (animated)


l-triomino_124_upright_static1

Hourglass fractal (static)


Then I unexpectedly came across the fractal again when playing with what I call a proximity fractal:
v4_ban15_sw3_anim

Hourglass animated (proximity fractal)


v4_ban15_sw3_col

(Static image)


Now I’ve unexpectedly come across it for a third time, playing with a very simple fractal based on a 2×2 square. At first glance, the 2×2 square yields only one interesting fractal. If you divide the square into four smaller squares and discard one square, then do the same to each of the three sub-copies, then repeat, you get a form of the Sierpiński triangle, like this:

sq2x2_123_1

Sierpiński triangle stage 1


sq2x2_123_2

Sierpiński triangle #2


sq2x2_123_3

Sierpiński triangle #3


sq2x2_123_4

Sierpiński triangle #4


sq2x2_123

Sierpiński triangle animated


sq2x2_123_static

(Static image)


The 2×2 square seems too simple for anything more, but there’s a simple way to enrich it: label the corners of the sub-squares so that you can, as it were, individually rotate them 0°, 90°, 180°, or 270°. One set of rotations produces the hourglass fractal, like this:

sq2x2_123_013_1

Hourglass stage 1


sq2x2_123_013_2

Hourglass #2


sq2x2_123_013_3

Fractal #3


sq2x2_123_013_4

Hourglass #4


sq2x2_123_013_5

Hourglass #5


sq2x2_123_013_6

Hourglass #6


sq2x2_123_013

Hourglass animated


sq2x2_123_013_static

(Static image)


Here are some more fractals from the 2×2 square created using this technique (I’ve found some of them previously by other routes):

sq2x2_123_022


sq2x2_123_022_static

(Static image)


sq2x2_123_031


sq2x2_123_031_static

(Static image)


sq2x2_123_102


sq2x2_123_102_static

(Static image)


sq2x2_123_2011


sq2x2_123_201_static

(Static image)


sq2x2_123_211


sq2x2_123_211_static

(Static image)


sq2x2_123_213


sq2x2_123_213_static

(Static image)


sq2x2_123_033_-111


sq2x2_123_033_-111_static

(Static image)


sq2x2_123_201_1-11_static

(Static image)


sq2x2_200_1-11_static

(Static image)


sq2x2_123_132

(Static image)


He Say, He Sigh, He Sow #41

κατ’ ἐπακολούθημα δὲ καὶ περὶ τῆς ἐγκυκλίου καλουμένης παιδείας, εἰς ὅσα εὔχρηστος, περί τε ἀστρολογικῆς καὶ μαθηματικῆς καὶ μαγικῆς γοητείας τε ἐπιδραμητέον. αὐχοῦσι γὰρ δὴ καὶ ἐπὶ ταῖσδε οἱ Πανέλληνες ὡς μεγίσταις ἐπιστήμαις. — Κλήμης ὁ Ἀλεξανδρεύς, Στρώματα.

   “By consequence, also we must treat of what is called the curriculum of study — how far it is serviceable; and of astrology, and mathematics, and magic, and sorcery. For all the Greeks boast of these as the highest sciences.” — Clement of Alexandria, The Stromata, Book II.

T4K1NG S3LF13S

It’s like watching a seed grow. You take a number and count how many 0s it contains, then how many 1s, how many 2s, 3s, 4s and so on. Then you create a new number by writing the count of each digit followed by the digit itself. Then you repeat the process with the new number.

Here’s how it works if you start with the number 1:

1

The count of digits is one 1, so the new number is this:

→ 11

The count of digits for 11 is two 1s, so the next number is:

→ 21

The count of digits for 21 is one 1, one 2, so the next number is:

→ 1112

The count of digits for 1112 is three 1s, one 2, so the next number is:

→ 3112

The count of digits for 3112 is two 1s, one 2, one 3, so the next number is:

→ 211213

What happens after that? Here are the numbers as a sequence:

1 → 11 → 21 → 1112 → 3112 → 211213 → 312213 → 212223 → 114213 → 31121314 → 41122314 → 31221324 → 21322314

That’s all you need, because something interesting happens with 21322314. The digit count is two 1s, three 2s, two 3s, one 4, so the next number is:

→ 21322314

In other words, 21322314 is what might be called a self-descriptive number: it describes the count of its own digits. That’s why I think this procedure is like watching a seed grow. You start with the tiny seed of 1 and end in the giant oak of 21322314, whose factorization is 2 * 3^2 * 13 * 91121. But there are many more self-descriptive numbers in base ten and some of them are much bigger than 21322314. A047841 at the Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences lists all 109 of them (and calls them “autobiographical numbers”). Here are a few, starting with the simplest possible:

22 → two 2s → 22
10213223 → one 0, two 1s, three 2s, two 3s → 10213223
10311233 → one 0, three 1s, one 2, three 3s → 10311233
21322314 → two 1s, three 2s, two 3s, one 4 → 21322314
21322315 → two 1s, three 2s, two 3s, one 5 → 21322315
21322316 → two 1s, three 2s, two 3s, one 6 → 21322316*
1031223314 → one 0, three 1s, two 2s, three 3s, one 4 → 10
31223314
3122331415 → three 1s, two 2s, three 3s, one 4, one 5
→ 3122331415
3122331416 → three 1s, two 2s, three 3s, one 4, one 6
→ 3122331416*

*And for 21322317, 21322318, 21322319; 3122331417, 3122331418, 3122331419.


And here’s what happens when you seed a sequence with a number containing all possible digits in base ten:

1234567890 → 10111213141516171819 → 101111213141516171819 → 101211213141516171819 → 101112213141516171819

That final number is self-descriptive:

101112213141516171819 → one 0, eleven 1s, two 2s, one 3, one 4, one 5, one 6, one 7, one 8, one 9 → 101112213141516171819

So some numbers are self-descriptive and some start a sequence that ends in a self-descriptive number. But that doesn’t exhaust the possibilities. Some numbers are part of a loop:

103142132415 → 104122232415 → 103142132415
104122232415 → 103142132415 → 104122232415
1051421314152619 → 1061221324251619 → 1051421314152619…
5142131415261819 → 6122132425161819 → 5142131415261819
106142131416271819 → 107122132426171819 → 106142131416271819


10512223142518 → 10414213142518 → 10512213341518 → 10512223142518
51222314251718 → 41421314251718 → 51221334151718 →
51222314251718

But all that is base ten. What about other bases? In fact, nearly all self-descriptive numbers in base ten are also self-descriptive in other bases. An infinite number of other bases, in fact. 22 is a self-descriptive number for all b > 2. The sequence seeded with 1 is identical in all b > 4:

1 → 11 → 21 → 1112 → 3112 → 211213 → 312213 → 212223 → 114213 → 31121314 → 41122314 → 31221324 → 2132231421322314

In bases 2, 3 and 4, the sequence seeded with 1 looks like this:

1 → 11 → 101 → 10101 → 100111 → 1001001 → 1000111 → 11010011101001… (b=2) (1101001[2] = 105 in base 10)
1 → 11 → 21 → 1112 → 10112 → 1010112 → 2011112 → 10111221011122… (b=3) (1011122[3] = 854 in base 10)
1 → 11 → 21 → 1112 → 3112 → 211213 → 312213 → 212223 → 1110213 → 101011213 → 201111213 → 101112213101112213… (b=4) (101112213[4] = 71079 in base 10)

In base 2 there are only two self-descriptive numbers (and no loops):

111 → three 1s → 111… (b=2) (111 = 7 in base 10)
1101001 → three 0s, four 1s → 1101001… (b=2) (1101001 = 105 in base 10)

So if you apply the “count digits” procedure in base 2, all numbers, except 111, begin a sequence that ends in 1101001. Base 3 has a few more self-descriptive numbers and also some loops:

2222… (b >= 3)
10111 → one 0, four 1s → 10111… (b=3)
11112 → four 1s, one 2 → 11112
100101 → three 0s, three 1s → 100101… (b=3)
1011122 → one 0, four 1s, two 2s → 1011122… (b=3)
2021102 → two 0s, two 1s, three 2s → 2021102… (b=3)
10010122 → three 0s, three 1s, two 2s → 10010122


2012112 → 10101102 → 10011112 → 2012112
10011112 → 2012112 → 10101102 → 10011112
10101102 → 10011112 → 2012112 → 10101102

A question I haven’t been able to answer: Is there a base in which loops can be longer than these?

103142132415 → 104122232415 → 103142132415
10512223142518 → 10414213142518 → 10512213341518 → 10512223142518

A question I have been able to answer: What is the sequence when it’s seeded with the title of this blog-post? T4K1NGS3LF13S is a number in all bases >= 30 and its base-30 form equals 15,494,492,743,722,316,018 in base 10 (with the factorization 2 * 72704927 * 106557377767). If T4K1NGS3LF13S seeds a sequence in any b >= 30, the result looks like this:

T4K1NGS3LF13S → 2123141F1G1K1L1N2S1T → 813213141F1G1K1L1N1S1T → A1122314181F1G1K1L1N1S1T → B1221314181A1F1G1K1L1N1S1T → C1221314181A1B1F1G1K1L1N1S1T → D1221314181A1B1C1F1G1K1L1N1S1T → E1221314181A1B1C1D1F1G1K1L1N1S1T → F1221314181A1B1C1D1E1F1G1K1L1N1S1T → G1221314181A1B1C1D1E2F1G1K1L1N1S1T → F1321314181A1B1C1D1E1F2G1K1L1N1S1T → F1222314181A1B1C1D1E2F1G1K1L1N1S1T → E1421314181A1B1C1D1E2F1G1K1L1N1S1T → F1221324181A1B1C1D2E1F1G1K1L1N1S1T → E1421314181A1B1C1D1E2F1G1K1L1N1S1T

Tri-Way to L

The name is more complicated than the shape: L-triomino. The shape is simply three squares forming an L. And it’s a rep-tile — it can be divided into four smaller copies of itself.

l-triomino

An L-triomino — three squares forming an L


l-triomino_anim

L-triomino as rep-tile


That means it can also be turned into a fractal, as I’ve shown in Rep-Tiles Revisited and Get Your Prox Off #2. First you divide an L-triomino into four sub-copies, then discard one sub-copy, then repeat. Here are the standard L-triomino fractals produced by this technique:

l-triomino_123_134

Fractal from L-triomino — divide and discard


l-triomino_234


l-triomino_124


l-triomino_124_upright


l-triomino_124_upright_static1

(Static image)


l-triomino_124_upright_static2

(Static image)


But those fractals don’t exhaust the possibilities of this very simple shape. The standard L-triomino doesn’t have true chirality. That is, it doesn’t come in left- and right-handed forms related by mirror-reflection. But if you number its corners for the purposes of sub-division, you can treat it as though it comes in two distinct orientations. And when the orientations are different in the different sub-copies, new fractals appear. You can also delay the stage at which you discard the first sub-copy. For example, you can divide the L-triomino into four sub-copies, then divide each sub-copy into four more sub-copies, and only then begin discarding.

Here are the new fractals that appear when you apply these techniques:

l-triomino_124_exp

Delay before discarding


l-triomino_124_exp_static

(Static image)


l-triomino_124_tst2_static1

(Static image)


l-triomino_124_tst2_static2

(Static image)


l-triomino_124_tst1


l-triomino_124_tst1_static1

(Static image)


l-triomino_124_tst1_static2

(Static image)


l-triomino_134_adj1

Adjust orientation


l-triomino_134_adj2


l-triomino_134_adj3


l-triomino_134_adj3_tst3

(Static image)


l-triomino_134_adj4


l-triomino_134_exp_static

(Static image)


l-triomino_234_exp

Performativizing Papyrocentricity #51

Papyrocentric Performativity Presents:

Bits of the Best – The Shorter Strachey, Lytton Strachey, ed. Michael Holroyd and Paul Levy (Oxford University Press 1980)

Shaman On U!Copendium: An Expedition into the Rock’n’Roll Underworld, Julian Cope (Faber and Faber 2012)

Scorpions and Sea-LordsPhilip’s Guide to Seashells, A.P.H. Oliver, illustrated by James Nicholls (various)

Spike-U-LikeThe Cactus Handbook, Erik Haustein, translated by Pamela Marwood (Cathay Books 1988)

GlasguitargangDog Eat Dog: A Story of Survival, Struggle and Triumph by the Man Who Put AC/DC on the World Stage, Michael Browning (Allen & Unwin 2014)


Or Read a Review at Random: RaRaR